Massage is the manipulation of soft tissues in the body. Massage techniques are commonly applied with hands, fingers, elbows, knees, forearms, feet, or a device. The purpose of massage is generally for the treatment of body stress or pain. A person who was professionally trained to give massages was traditionally known as a masseur (male) or a masseuse (female), but those titles are outmoded, and carry some negative connotations. In the United States, the title massage therapist has been recognized as a business norm for those who have been professionally trained to give massages.
Good pain. In massage, there is a curious phenomenon widely known as “good pain.” It arises from a sensory contradiction between the sensitivity to pressure and the “instinctive” sense that the pressure is also a source of relief. So pressure can be an intense sensation that just feels right somehow. It’s strong, but it’s welcome. Good pains are usually dull and aching, and are often described as a “sweet” aching. The best good pain may be such a relief that “pain” isn’t even really the right word.

Trigger points or stress points may also cause muscle soreness and decreased flexibility. These points are specific spots in muscle and tendons which cause pain when pressed, and which may radiate pain to a larger area. They are not bruises, but are thought by some to be small areas of spasm. Trigger points may be caused by sudden trauma (like falling or being hit), or may develop over time from the stress and strain of heavy physical exertion or from repeated use of a particular muscle.
Like massages, chiropractic care can be beneficial for lowering pain and improving recovery. It’s also been shown to lower stress, headaches and more. One way that chiropractors help treat pain is by lowering mechanical compression and irritation of spinal joints, which can send nerve signals throughout the body that increase inflammation and irritation.

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International Institute of Reflexology has been conducting reflexology training and course. This institute has acceptable qualification and has been teaching for over 50 years to the highest professional standard. This institute teaches the original Ingham method and it is taught only by tutors who have approved licence from the IIR to ensure that authenticity is maintained. All the graduates have international and European recognition for their training by the addition of City and Guides Level 3.
A graduate of the Baltimore School of Massage’s class of 2011, Heather is generous, thoughtful and compassionate. She approaches each client with a calm, positive attitude and her best healing intentions. She sees massage as an opportunity to reconnect with the body and facilitate awareness. From beginning to end, she evaluates and addresses any blockage or dysfunction. She wants every client to leave feeling better than when they arrived. Whether the goal is to alleviate pain, increase mobility, ease the mind or simply melt on the table, your needs will be listened to and addressed to the best of her capabilities. She understands the importance in finding a balance of work and the rest of life. She relaxes by listening to music and podcasts, going to concerts is the ideal outing. She loves spending time with her family, dining out with loved ones and traveling. Thank you for taking a moment to learn about Heather, please book your appointment soon!
Although many assume Swedish massage comes from Sweden, Johan Georg Mezger (1838-1909), a Dutch man, is often credited with formalizing the system known as Swedish massage—sometimes referred to as “classic massage” in Europe. Mezger assigned French names— effleurage, petrissage, friction, and tapotement—to the specific strokes used in Swedish massage application. In English, these movements are known as stroking, kneading, rubbing (friction), and striking.

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