Ugly pain in massage therapy is, by my definition, never okay. Ugly pain is often caused by things that are not going to offer even minimal, delayed benefits, and may even be dangerous. It’s important to be able to spot ugly pain for what it is and completely eliminate it from any therapy you’re receiving. What kinds of handling may cause “ugly” pain?
Swedish massages utilize variations of strokes, and the body responds to the pressure, duration, and speed of those strokes in different ways. Long, quick strokes stimulate blood flow to tissue. Gentle, slow, topical strokes promote general relaxation. The technique of delivering the massage largely depends on what the massage is intended to address. 

Despite the name, Swedish massages have absolutely nothing to do with Sweden. In fact, they’re from a completely different part of the globe. Swedish massage takes elements from almost every other type of massage, giving it a reputation for being the best of both worlds. Swedish massage is almost like trail mix – everything comes together to blend into a pleasant experience. The origin of the name seems to have come from a Swedish man, Per Henrick Ling, who utilized this mixed method style of massage to ease aches and pains from his rheumatism. 

Light relaxation massage is similar to deep tissue massage but the technique of massage applying is a bit gentler. This kind of massage can be performed on fully clothed person and is very suitable for first time client who tends to feel uncomfortable. Just like all other massage therapies this technique also acts as healing mechanism and helps in alleviating stress by promoting relaxation in the entire body.


Although many assume Swedish massage comes from Sweden, Johan Georg Mezger (1838-1909), a Dutch man, is often credited with formalizing the system known as Swedish massage—sometimes referred to as “classic massage” in Europe. Mezger assigned French names— effleurage, petrissage, friction, and tapotement—to the specific strokes used in Swedish massage application. In English, these movements are known as stroking, kneading, rubbing (friction), and striking.

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A graduate of the Baltimore School of Massage’s class of 2011, Heather is generous, thoughtful and compassionate. She approaches each client with a calm, positive attitude and her best healing intentions. She sees massage as an opportunity to reconnect with the body and facilitate awareness. From beginning to end, she evaluates and addresses any blockage or dysfunction. She wants every client to leave feeling better than when they arrived. Whether the goal is to alleviate pain, increase mobility, ease the mind or simply melt on the table, your needs will be listened to and addressed to the best of her capabilities. She understands the importance in finding a balance of work and the rest of life. She relaxes by listening to music and podcasts, going to concerts is the ideal outing. She loves spending time with her family, dining out with loved ones and traveling. Thank you for taking a moment to learn about Heather, please book your appointment soon!

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Before booking an appointment, ask questions about the therapist’s education and experience, like “What is your training?” “How many years have you been practicing?” and “Do you work frequently with runners?”, suggests Gammal. Seek referrals if possible, and ensure s/he is a licensed massage therapist. Rotenberger recommends a massage therapist specifically trained in orthopedic treatment and assessment, as s/he will know when to refer you to another healthcare professional, in the case that you’re experiencing chronic pain and discomfort not fixable via massage. You can find a reputable practitioner via www.orthomassage.net or www.NeuroMuscular-Reprogramming.com.

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